IT’S ALS AND NOT ASL

MY ALS ICE BUCKET CHALLENGE MUST SEEs:

1. NOMA VS. RENÉ REDZEPI

2. ANTHONY BOURDAIN

3. FOO FIGHTERS VS. THE PROM CRASHERS

4. BILL GATES

5. PAUL BISSONNETTE

Some of the people I wanna see take this challenge:

Adam Savage, David Rees, Jamie Hyneman, Mads Mikkelsen, Bryan Fuller, Edgar Wright, Tablo, Hayley Williams, Ferran Adrià, G-Dragon, Neil Gaiman, Malcolm Gladwell, Chris Hadfield, Larry King, Simon Cowell, and Zachary Levi.

I used to envy those with innate abilities, things a lot of us call talents, but no more. I am truly jealous of people who gladly, or willingly, sacrifice a lot of stuff for their future. People who work their butt off for money, life, decency. Maybe, sometimes for social hierarchy. Maybe, sometimes for happiness. Sometimes, and probably for me, to get rid of haunting regrets of the past.

Umami: the taste we love but can't describe | The Japan Times

Click the title to read the full article.

The theory of people having separate taste palettes in distinct parts of the tongue has now been debunked for years. Melinda Joe writes about the history of the fifth taste, also known as “umami” in this rather short, yet brief article for the Japan Times. She also features biophysicist Ole Mouritsen and chef Klavs Styrbaek’s new book Umami: Unlocking the Secrets of the Fifth Taste. 

The way any animal thinks depends on limitations of mind and body. If we learn our limitations too soon, we never learn our power.

Hannibal Lecter, Hannibal

Show of reblogs of those who are just in awe that Hannibal did not get ANY Emmy nomination this year. And last year. I mean, come on.

EAT THE RUDE
Hey guys, it’s been quite a while since I last blogged. Today I wanna write about my latest obsession. Something that I can’t get my head off for the past week or so.
From the picture above, some of you might have guessed that it’s Hannibal Lecter. Not the series, the movies, or the novels per se, but the sole character of Dr. Hannibal Lecter himself.
Just a short intro to those alien to this world. Hannibal Lecter is a fictional character created by novelist Thomas Harris. Red Dragon was the first novel he published on Hannibal Lecter, in 1981. He made a series of novels following Red Dragon: The Silence of the Lambs, Hannibal and Hannibal Rising. Hannibal is basically a cannibal (which is the greatest pun of all time) and he is closely related to the FBI. All the novels tell the story when he is already captured, au contraire to the TV series which sets just a little before Red Dragon, where we can see him practice his cannibalism and manipulative “humanity” or “civility”. 
For the last three weeks, I have been slowly watching the series, created and produced by Bryan Fuller (Pushing Daisies, Heroes). I just finished watching the first season and currently watching the first episodes of season 2. Just so you know, the series was not my first exposure to the world of Hannibal Lecter. 
One of the reasons as to why this “obsession” is seminal to me is because I don’t watch horror/thriller stuff. Nor do I enjoy them, though there exists an irony of which I am an avid “fan” of forensic anthropology, human psychology and physiology. It took me about a good year until I forced myself to watch this series, because someone actually recommended it to me. 
I can tell you right now that the TV series is totally worth it. If you’re someone who enjoys entertainment with intelligent manipulation, seasoned with “schizophrenic” imagination and just a good dose of gore/exaggerated blood spits, this show might be for you. If you’re like me, who is sick of “clean” dead bodies or carcasses in typical crime shows, this show might be for you. This is a narrative in which you can engage criminal/forensic psychology and visual forensics in a level that I haven’t seen in other crime series. This Hannibal universe really showcases the limits of human “imagination”. There are a lot of conversations, for the sole reason that the show is not as high of a budget. Having said that, the show is extremely, beautifully shot. The sets and food are very believable. I’m really happy that the team chose Hugh Dancy and Mads Mikkelsen to play Will Graham and Hannibal respectively. 
If you’ve never been exposed to this world however, “viewer discretion is advised” really holds. I don’t think it’s so much the graphic imagery and gore per se, but more to the psychological effect of the story. In the books, the movies and the series especially, you get to experience madness, whether from the killer’s, profiler’s or the cannibal’s perspective. 
I’m also reading Red Dragon, and I’m enjoying every page of it.

EAT THE RUDE

Hey guys, it’s been quite a while since I last blogged. Today I wanna write about my latest obsession. Something that I can’t get my head off for the past week or so.

From the picture above, some of you might have guessed that it’s Hannibal Lecter. Not the series, the movies, or the novels per se, but the sole character of Dr. Hannibal Lecter himself.

Just a short intro to those alien to this world. Hannibal Lecter is a fictional character created by novelist Thomas Harris. Red Dragon was the first novel he published on Hannibal Lecter, in 1981. He made a series of novels following Red Dragon: The Silence of the Lambs, Hannibal and Hannibal Rising. Hannibal is basically a cannibal (which is the greatest pun of all time) and he is closely related to the FBI. All the novels tell the story when he is already captured, au contraire to the TV series which sets just a little before Red Dragon, where we can see him practice his cannibalism and manipulative “humanity” or “civility”. 

For the last three weeks, I have been slowly watching the series, created and produced by Bryan Fuller (Pushing Daisies, Heroes). I just finished watching the first season and currently watching the first episodes of season 2. Just so you know, the series was not my first exposure to the world of Hannibal Lecter. 

One of the reasons as to why this “obsession” is seminal to me is because I don’t watch horror/thriller stuff. Nor do I enjoy them, though there exists an irony of which I am an avid “fan” of forensic anthropology, human psychology and physiology. It took me about a good year until I forced myself to watch this series, because someone actually recommended it to me. 

I can tell you right now that the TV series is totally worth it. If you’re someone who enjoys entertainment with intelligent manipulation, seasoned with “schizophrenic” imagination and just a good dose of gore/exaggerated blood spits, this show might be for you. If you’re like me, who is sick of “clean” dead bodies or carcasses in typical crime shows, this show might be for you. This is a narrative in which you can engage criminal/forensic psychology and visual forensics in a level that I haven’t seen in other crime series. This Hannibal universe really showcases the limits of human “imagination”. There are a lot of conversations, for the sole reason that the show is not as high of a budget. Having said that, the show is extremely, beautifully shot. The sets and food are very believable. I’m really happy that the team chose Hugh Dancy and Mads Mikkelsen to play Will Graham and Hannibal respectively. 

If you’ve never been exposed to this world however, “viewer discretion is advised” really holds. I don’t think it’s so much the graphic imagery and gore per se, but more to the psychological effect of the story. In the books, the movies and the series especially, you get to experience madness, whether from the killer’s, profiler’s or the cannibal’s perspective. 

I’m also reading Red Dragon, and I’m enjoying every page of it.

Paramore: A Day in the Life Pictures - We're Paramore | Rolling Stone

Click the title to see the gallery.

Come backstage with photographer Lindsey Byrnes and Paramore’s vocals Hayley Williams as they take you to a day in a life with Paramore.

I’m guessing that this is quite the old portfolio from Hayley’s hair. Anyways, I enjoyed these photos. Hope you do to !  

Realizations are the worst !

Liz Lemon, 30 Rock

When he gazes at a victim, you’re not sure whether he’s debating sauté versus roast or trying to remember where he parked.

Mike Hale on “Hannibal”, for the New York Times